Wednesday, October 22, 2008

Sarah Palin Doesn't Know What Her Job Would Be

Wow, generally when one takes a job they know what they're in for --- meaning, they know what the job will be. Sarah Palin doesn't.

On Monday, Sarah Palin was interviewed by KUSA, an NBC affiliate in Colorado. In response to a question sent to the network by a third grader at a local elementary school about what the Vice President does, Palin erroneously argued that the Vice President is “in charge of the United States Senate“:
Q: Brandon Garcia wants to know, “What does the Vice President do?”

PALIN: That’s something that Piper would ask me, as as second grader also. That's a great question, Brandon. And, a Vice-President has a really great job, because not only are they there to support the President's agenda; they're like the team member, the teammate to that President, but also, they're in charge of the U.S. Senate so if they want to they can really get in there with the senators and make a lot of good policy changes that will make life better for Brandon and his family and his classroom, and it's a great job, and I look forward to having that job.
Quick, someone get this woman a copy of the Constitution. Or a civics book, even.

Sorry, you don't get in there and create legislation.

Article I of the Constitution defines the Vice-President's role, pretty much nothing, really. He or she gets to vote when the Senate is deadlocked.
The Vice President of the United States shall be President of the Senate, but shall have no vote, unless they be equally divided.
And, despite being "President of the Senate," the Senate's website explains further the modern role of Vice-Presidents.
During the twentieth century, the role of the vice president has evolved into more of an executive branch position. Now, the vice president is usually seen as an integral part of a president's administration and presides over the Senate only on ceremonial occasions or when a tie-breaking vote may be needed.
and
In practice, the number of times vice presidents have exercised this right has varied greatly. John Adams holds the record at 29 votes, followed closely by John C. Calhoun with 28. Since the 1870s, however, no vice president has cast as many as 10 tie-breaking votes.
Sarah Palin, remember some of your high school civics --- oh, wait, I forgot what a poor student you were --- and you might know exactly what job you will have.

Watch the video:



2 comments:

Anonymous said...

How can she be this dumb? Seriously? Read her answers to the CNN interview, she digs her own grave. No thesis statements, she talks in weird circles I'd expect from myself if forced to answer political questions. I graduated cum laude from SPU in 1998...I feel I'd be just as good or better. I'm a woman, listening to her parrot-speak is embarrassing to me!

The National Benefit Authority said...

John Adams holds the record at 29 votes, followed closely by John C. Calhoun with 28. Since the 1870s, however, no vice president has cast as many as 10 tie-breaking votes.